Repair Inspiration: Eat Vegetarian, Cut Your Carbon Footprint

There are lots of ways to “eat green” and live an eco-friendly lifestyle, but a new report published in the journal Climactic Change suggests that one of the best things you can do to lower your carbon footprint is to eat a vegetarian diet.

Whether you are a long time vegan or not a fan of the idea of living meat free (on Meatless Monday or any day), check out this story excerpt below, or read the whole thing on The Huffington Post.

Vegetarianism Cuts Your Dietary Carbon Footprint A Ridiculous Amount, Study Finds
By: Joanna Zelman

As the economic, political and personal costs of doing nothing to mitigate climate change skyrocket, there’s one lifestyle change that slashes dietary greenhouse gas emissions in half: Veganism.

Climate change is predicted to cost the U.S. billions of dollars by mid-century, poses a growing national security threat, and will make some regions of America “unsuited for outdoor activity.”

A new report published in the journal Climatic Change compared greenhouse gas emissions attributable to more than 55,000 meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in the U.K. The researchers found that meat-eaters’ dietary greenhouse gas emissions were twice as high as vegans’.

The production, transportation and storage of food greatly contributes to emissions, the study points out. These emissions range from carbon dioxide related to fossil fuels used to power farm machinery, to the methane released by livestock. Animal-based products tend to release more emissions than plant-based products due to the methane animals can produce and the inefficiencies in growing livestock feed.

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Repair Interview: Betsy Besser on Challah for Hunger

If Challah for Hunger had an official motto, it might be “think global, bake local.” The organization engages college students on colleges and universities across the country to bake and sell challah to raise money for local and national causes. With 67 active chapters, 16,844 loaves eaten, and $64,837 raised for social justice causes in 2013, they have proven the power of delicious bread – and committed volunteers! – to make a difference.

Recently, Repair the World chatted with Betsy Besser, a rising junior at University of Vermont to find out why she brought Challah for Hunger to her campus, how they have made it their own, and why peanut butter chocolate chip challah is a very, very good idea.

How did you first get involved with Challah for Hunger?
I grew up in Memphis, and going all the way up to Vermont for school really felt like going out of my comfort zone. I was looking for a way to connect my Jewish life, which felt familiar, to my school life. I didn’t immediately connect to the Hillel community, but then this past fall I was asked to be part of a Hillel Fellowship program that supports students in starting new initiatives on campus.

Building a Jewish community that cares about making a difference was a big part of what I wanted to do. I had seen several of my friends mention things about Challah for Hunger chapters at their universities, so I Googled it and thought it sounded really cool. I grew up with Shabbat dinner being a big part of my weekend, so I figured the program could be a great way to bring something new to UVM that incorporated my Jewish life.

How does the program work on your campus?
This past semester we baked every other week, and we would usually have about 20 or 25 volunteers show up. We make special flavors like peanut butter chocolate chip, cinnamon raisin, and cherry walnut chocolate – and we are planning to do a pesto challah next year. Last year we would bake on Wednesdays and sell challah on Thursdays, along with hummus that we also made. Most people bought the challah as a snack to bring with them to the library or back to their dorms. We decided not to sell our challah on Fridays because the Chabad on campus gives out free challah on Fridays and we did not want to step on their toes.

challahs Next year, we are hoping to partner with another organization on campus called Feel Good that sells grilled cheese sandwiches and donates the money to an organization called The Hunger Project. We’re hoping that they will start making their sandwiches with our challah, and donate a percentage of the proceeds to Challah for Hunger. We are also hoping to start focusing even more on local food. One idea is to buy locally grown apples from Vermont and make a special Rosh Hashanah challah with them.

What has the response from the UVM community been like?
People in Burlington have really embraced the idea of making a difference through food, so the students have been really supportive as customers and volunteers. There are also a lot of great local bakeries and organizations that have gotten involved. For example, King Arthur Flour, which is based in Vermont, has been incredibly generous with donating eggs, honey, and sugar. UVM also has a kosher kitchen on campus called Vermont Kosher, and the head chef there, Rachel Jacobs, has been super supportive and brought great ideas to the program.

How have the students at UVM made the program their own?
This past semester we started to build a board. There are four other women on it, and not all of them are Jewish, which is really interesting. One of our goals was to make our Challah for Hunger chapter into something with broad appeal. We have found that people are really willing to come and bake or sell challah every week, even if they don’t have a Jewish connection to challah.

challah for hunger UVM What organizations do you support with the proceeds?
Half of the proceeds to go the American Jewish World Service and the rest goes to Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf, which is a local hunger organization. We decided to support their work because they make a big positive impact on the Burlington community.

Any last thoughts?
I’m really thankful for Hillel for giving me the opportunity to bring Challah for Hunger to UVM, and for their continued support. If people want to learn more, they can check out our Facebook group, Groovy UV Challah for Hunger.

Repair Inspiration: Auschwitz Survivor Meets German Hip-Hop Duo

File this under awesome: A recent New York Times article told the story about an 89-year old Holocaust survivor who is teaming up with a German hip-hop group called Microphone Mafia to spread music and a message. Read an excerpt below and find the whole article on the Times’ website.

NEW YORK TIMES
Amid the Rap Music, Echoes of an Orchestra Playing in a Dark Past
By: Sally McGrane
June 27, 2014

“BERLIN — AT various points during shows, the German rapper Kutlu Yurtseven gestures to a bandmate sitting demurely off to the side. That’s the cue for 89-year-old Esther Bejarano, a diminutive woman with a snow-white pixie cut, to jump in with a song. “When will the heavens open up, again, for me?” is one favorite, the refrain of a local carnival tune. “When will they open up?”

It is an unusual pairing. Ms. Bejarano is one of the last surviving members of the Auschwitz Girls’ Orchestra, the only all-female ensemble among the many Nazi-run prisoner musical groups in the camp system. Among other duties, the Girls’ Orchestra was responsible for playing the marches that imprisoned women had to keep step to as they went out to work in the morning and, even more cruelly, as they returned, half-dead, at the end of the day.

Five years ago, hoping to reach more young people with her story and her message of tolerance and anti-fascism, Ms. Bejarano teamed up with Microphone Mafia, a German hip-hop duo with Turkish and Italian roots. They have released their first album, and have been playing concerts throughout Germany and Europe ever since.

The music combines songs like the poignant Yiddish resistance song, “We’ll Live Forever,” composed in the Nazi-run Jewish ghetto in Vilna just before it was liquidated, with rap passages about current problems like racism that, in Ms. Bejarano’s view, show that the lessons of the Holocaust still need to be learned.”

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Crowdsourced Summer Reading List!

Ahhh, summer. There’s no better time to head to your favorite bookstore or download a bunch of virtual tomes to Kindle and get reading!

Each summer, Repair the World puts out a hot weather reading list of our fave social change titles. This year, we’ve done the same, suggesting classic and hot-off-the-presses reads that are sure to inspire. But we also want to hear from YOU! Help us create the best-ever crowdsourced summer reading list by letting us know what world-changing books you’re bringing with you to the beach. Share your recs in the comments below or by tweeting @repairtheworld #SummerReading.

I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS
Maya Angelou
Beloved feminist poet and writer, Maya Angelou, passed away this year. Celebrate her life and work by reading (or rereading!) her classic 1969 autobiography, which explores subjects including racism, identity, and being a woman.

THE THIRD PLATE: FIELD NOTES FROM THE FUTURE OF FOOD
Dan Barber
One of America’s most respected chefs and food activists shares his thoughts on how the local food movement has failed to achieve its goals – and how it can do better. Barber’s food writing is as lively and passionate as it is informative, and this just-released book is among his best.

A FIGHTING CHANCE
Elizabeth Warren
Read the newly-released autobiography of the Massachusetts senator – from her childhood in small-town Oklahoma to her current status as one of the country’s most passionate, rabble-rousing defenders of the middle class.

THE END OF POVERTY
Jeffrey Sachs
Delve into some thrilling (really!) money talk, as economist Jeffery D. Sachs shares his knowledge and vision for creating a “safer, more prosperous future” for the world.

I AM MALALA
Malala Yousafzai
If you haven’t already, now is the time to pick up a copy of the courageous young Pakistani woman and human rights activist who refused to be silenced in her fight for education.

So, what are YOU reading this summer? Tweet us at @repairtheworld #SummerReading.

Repair Inspiration: Eden Village Camp Makes the New York Times

Here at Repair the World, we have been big fans of Eden Village Camp – the Jewish organic farm camp – since the get go. We have profiled their awesome summer program, with its environmentally-focused, hands-on, empowering approach to summer camp education. We even volunteered to help them build their greenhouse!

So we were very psyched to see Putnam Valley, New York-based program profiled recently in the New York Times for its innovative and gutsy “no body talk” policy, which aims to shift kids’ and preteens’ awareness from a body image and style-driven focus to deeper engagement with one another. Check out the excerpt, and read the full piece at The New York Times’ website:

No Body Talk at Summer Camps
New York Times, July 18, 2014

“Last August, on a clear summer day, Tom and Maura Gould were driving their 12-year-old daughter from Eden Village, an organic farming camp in Putnam Valley, N.Y., to their home in Cambridge, Mass., when they started talking about family members who were particularly hairy.

“Why would you want to talk about that?” their daughter, Aviva, asked from the back seat. “There are much better things to talk about than someone’s looks.”

For many people, including children, talking about physical attributes would be no big deal. But for Aviva, this kind of talk sounded an alarm, mostly because she had not heard it at camp.

At Eden Village, staff members and campers follow something called the “no body talk” rule. “The specific rule is while at camp, we take a break from mentioning physical appearance, including clothing,” said Vivian Stadlin, who founded the camp six years ago with her husband, Yoni Stadlin. “And it’s about myself or others, be it negative, neutral or even positive.”

On Friday afternoon, when the campers, girls and boys from 8 to 17, are dressed in white and especially polished for the Sabbath, they refrain from complimenting one another’s appearances. Rather, they say, “Your soul shines” or “I feel so happy to be around you” or “Your smile lights up the world,” Ms. Stadlin said.

Signs posted on the mirrors in the bathroom read, “Don’t check your appearance, check your soul.”

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